The Roman civil wars, 49-45 B.C.
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The Roman civil wars, 49-45 B.C. by Terence Wise

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Published by Model and Allied Publications in Hemel Hempstead .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Rome

Subjects:

  • Rome -- History -- Civil War, 49-45 B.C.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesBattles for wargamers, A Bellona book
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDG266 .W57
The Physical Object
Pagination44 p. (12 fold.).
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5102383M
ISBN 100852423845
LC Control Number74174499
OCLC/WorldCa1031720

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Rome -- History -- Civil War, B.C Filed under: Rome -- History -- Civil War, B.C Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic and Civil Wars: with the Supplementary Books Attributed to Hirtius, by Julius Caesar and Aulus Hirtius, trans. by W. A. McDevitte and W. S. Bohn (HTML at Virginia). Caesar's Civil War (49–45 BC), also known as the Great Roman Civil War, was one of the last politico-military conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the Roman began as a series of political and military confrontations, between Julius Caesar (–44 BC), his political supporters (broadly known as Populares), and his legions, against the Optimates (or Boni Date: 10 January 49 BC – 17 March 45 BC, (4 years, 2 . The Roman civil war of 49 BC, sometimes called Caesar's Civil War, is one of the last conflicts within the Roman was a series of political and military confrontations between Julius Caesar, his political supporters, and his legions, against the traditionalist conservative faction in the Roman Senate, sometimes known as the Optimates, or boni, backed by legions loyal to Pompey. The civil war in ancient Rome lasted from 49 to 45 BC and was one of the last major internal conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the empire. It began with the clashes between Guy Julius Caesar ( BC), his political supporters (populists) and loyal legions against the optimas led by Gnaeus Pompey the Great.

Five of those ten surviving books cover the Roman civil wars and form the volume reviewed here. Appian provides the only surviving continuous history of Rome in the tumultuous years of to 70 B.C., the end of the Roman s: Julius Caesar - Julius Caesar - Antecedents and outcome of the civil war of 49–45 bce: During his conquest of Gaul, Caesar had been equally busy in preserving and improving his position at home. He used part of his growing wealth from Gallic loot to hire political agents in Rome. Meanwhile the cohesion of the triumvirate had been placed under strain. 49–45 BC: Caesar's Civil War between Julius Caesar and the Optimates initially led by Pompey the Great Roman civil war of –, 'Dictionary of Wars, Revised Edition' (Checkmark Books, New York, ) See also. List of Roman wars and battles This page was last edited on 2 November. Situated along the Guadalquivir river and commanding the plains of Andalusia, the city of Cordova offers an attractive venue for the theme of the Roman civil wars of BCE. Involved in the campaigns of 49 and 45 BCE, the city has an excellent archaeological site and museum collection, aside from being a cultural centre of note as a result.

Click to read more about Battles for Wargamers: The Roman Civil Wars BC by Terence Wise. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers All about Battles for Wargamers: The Roman Civil Wars BC by Terence : Terence Wise. The remaining books of the civil wars treat of those waged by the triumvirs against each other and the Roman people, until the end of these conflicts, and the greatest achievement, the battle of Actium, fought by Octavius Cæsar against Antony and Cleopatra together, . The Great Roman Civil War ( BC) was triggered by the rivalry between Julius Caesar and his conservative opposition in the Senate, and saw Caesar defeat all of his enemies in battles scattered around the Roman world, before famously being assassinated in Rome on the Ides of March, triggering yet another round of civil wars. Other articles where Roman Civil War is discussed: ancient Egypt: Dynastic strife and decline (–30 bce): by cultivating influence with powerful Roman commanders and using their capacity to aggrandize Roman clients and allies. Julius Caesar pursued Pompey to Egypt in 48 bce. After learning of Pompey’s murder at the hands of Egyptian courtiers, Caesar stayed long enough to enjoy a.