The social and religious life of a Guatemalan village
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The social and religious life of a Guatemalan village by Charles Wagley

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Published by American Anthropological Association in [Menasha, Wisc.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Indians of Central America -- Social life and customs,
  • Indians of Central America -- Guatemala,
  • Indians of Central America -- Religion,
  • Mam Indians,
  • Santiago Chimaltenango (Guatemala)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesAmerican anthropologist
SeriesMemoir series of the American Anthropological Association, no.71
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination150 p.
Number of Pages150
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15133078M

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TESTIMONY: DEATH OF A GUATEMALAN VILLAGE is an eyewitness account by a Guatemalan primary school teacher detailing one instance of violent conflict between the indigenous Maya people and the army. An accidental clash between the village's "civil patrol" and a Guatemalan army troop leads to the execution or imprisonment of many villagers.   Guatemalan farmer Oscar Lopez stands next to his corn crop. Stunted by drought, the corn should be as high as Lopez. If he loses his crop, he will lose his income.   Index to Roman Catholic periodicals, church documents and books pertinent to the study of Catholicism. present. Religious and Theological Abstracts from Religious and Theological Abstracts, Inc. Abstracts of articles in Christian (mainly Protestant), Jewish, and Muslim journals. : Leatha Miles-Edmonson.   Since the late s, Protestantism has emerged as a major force in the political and economic life of rural Guatemala. Indeed, as Sheldon Annis argues in this book, Protestantism may have helped tip Guatemala's guerrilla war in behalf of the army during the early what is it about Protestantism—and about Indians— that has led to massive religious .

Nevertheless, in local Mayan villages, colourful native attire is still common and varies according to the village and language group. Heavily attended fairs and religious festivals are scheduled in every part of Guatemala throughout the year. Food in Daily Life. Corn made into tortillas or tamales, black beans, rice, and wheat in the form of bread or pasta are staples eaten by nearly all Guatemalans. Depending on their degree of affluence, people also consume chicken, pork, and beef, and those living near bodies of water also eat fish and shellfish.   Like Guatemala. That country is reported to be the most evangelical country in the Americas. And, according to the Pew Research Center, it has the highest rate of believers that faith reaps success. One small mountain town is held up as proof.   TESTIMONY: DEATH OF A GUATEMALAN VILLAGE is an eyewitness account by a Guatemalan primary school teacher detailing one instance of violent conflict between the indigenous Maya people and the army. An accidental clash between the village's "civil patrol" and a Guatemalan army troop leads to the execution or imprisonment of many villagers.4/5.

The results imply that the dichotomous categories of Ladino and Indigenous are inadequate for measuring ethnicity in Guatemala. The newly developed attitude scales may be used to advance knowledge about ethnic relations in Guatemala and to test the generality of findings relating to relations between dominant and subordinate by: Values, Beliefs, and Attitudes Throughout our study of Honduran and Guatemalan culture we found several overarching values that the two cultures share. Both countries stress the importance of family and interdependence within the group. However, the criteria of what constitutes a family unit varies between the two. Guatemalan culture believes that family and . About seventy percent of the Guatemalan population is religious. When broken down, it contains Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Mayan religions. For the section of the population that value religion, they are very religious and attend their form of worship often. They strongly believe in the power of a greater being and actively use/apply their. Community life: How the many became one By Sr. Ileana Fernandez, C.S.J. Sharing and openness with the other sisters is built up little by little. In community we are not necessarily living with our best friends, so it takes time and a sense of growing in trust to share faith this deeply.